What is Cruelty-Free?

How to be cruelty-free:

So, you’re thinking about transitioning to cruelty-free beauty products? But you’ve already invested so much time and money creating a beauty empire that lives in a suitcase sized beauty bag, and you’re scared of starting over.

Well,  you don’t have to– according to cruelty-free makeup artist Rebecca Seals.

Jkissa shares a vibrant beauty look created with all cruelty-free products for her 296 million Instagram followers.

Jkissa shares a vibrant beauty look created with all cruelty-free products for her 296 million Instagram followers.

The local makeup artist offers tips on how to begin the transition to a cruelty-free makeup routine; ones that don’t require you to throw out your life savings in makeup.

“I understand the stress of those making the switch to cruelty-free,” she said, “When someone makes that decision they usually get this urge of passion and want to throw out every product they have that isn’t cruelty-free.”

But Seals recommends starting small for first timers and slowly incorporating more and more cruelty-free products over time.

“Take the three products you used most and buy them cruelty-free,” Seals suggests, “That’s the easiest and biggest step that will pave the way for a complete transition to cruelty-free.”

Jkissa (who does not give out her real name), also known as @jkissamakeupis a beauty blogger with close to 3 million followers on Instagram and Youtube. She shared her decision to become cruelty-free and vegetarianism began with her retreat with Lush, a 100% vegetarian cosmetics brand, to save sea turtles.

Jkissa with her dog Tsuki, @itmetsuki. After Jkissa rescued Tsuki, the dog developed cancer and had a leg amputated."

Jkissa with her dog Tsuki, @itmetsuki. After Jkissa rescued Tsuki, the dog developed cancer and had a leg amputated.”

“Seeing the damage we as humans are doing to them was really influential,” she said.

Jkissa urges her followers to do their own research before purchasing a product and points them to Logical Harmony for reliable, cruelty-free information.

Rochelle Rae, of Rae Cosmetics in Austin, advises those desiring to go cruelty-free to visit PETA’s website for a list of harmless products.

“Their website lists cruelty-free and non-cruelty-free cosmetic brands,” Rae said in an interview, “That’s a great place to start.”

What is cruelty-free?

In the world of cosmetics, there are multiple levels of production to make a beauty product ready for buyers, and testing is one of them.

Beauty product testing is not regulated by any government agency, therefore it’s up to the cosmetic brands themselves to define what cruelty-free means to their company and consumers.

This gray area can create confusion for consumers desiring a certain kind of product.

But, cruelty-free makeup generally means the product was not tested on animals during any stage of manufacturing.

Brands like Urban Decay and NYX adhere to these guidelines and are marked with “cruelty-free” logo on each product.

Some brands never test on animals and will make it known on their websites, such as Benefit Cosmetics or MAC, but aren’t considered cruelty free. Why?

If you look more closely, websites like these will read, “Some governments require animal testing before the product can be sold.”

According to the PETA website, the biggest obstacle to making beauty products cruelty-free is global expansion. China, where many makeup brand parent companies are located, requires animal testing before a product can go to market.

For this reason, Benefit Cosmetics and MAC cannot officially be labeled cruelty-free.

NARS announced their expansion to the Asian market; a shock to many consumers.

Though labels aren’t everything, as some brands do not test on animals but aren’t identified as cruelty-free. If you aren’t sure, it’s always best to do research on the brand you’re interested in.

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