Tag: music

Texas Revue: Diversity Meets Worlds of Talent

By Isabella Bejar, Marina Chairez and JD Harris

Beat boxing, dancing, rapping, singing, and many more unique talents drew a full crowd at Hogg Memorial Auditorium on April 23, 2016. Nearly 1,ooo people attended the University’s largest talent show, Texas Revue.

The University of Texas at Austin began hosting their annual student-run talent shows in the 1960’s and then re-established in 1995. The Texas Revue is composed of individuals and various student organizations. Different talents continue to bring the UT community together for one night, while showcasing a variety of talented acts.

Over 55 acts auditioned, but only around 10-12 acts can be featured each year. Performers compete in a Texas tradition to win the “Best Overall” award and $1,500, while the titles of “Crowd Favorite” and “Technical Excellence” are also up for grabs.

Many may have different goals, but it is truly shown that all contestants give their heart out on the stage and hope for the best. Ray Villarreal is the first solo rapper to perform at the Texas Revue.

“I would like to get known here at UT because that would be really big for me and great exposure. I would feel on top of the world. Either way it’s been a fun ride. I’m having the time of my life and being able to do these things that not a lot of other people can say that they’ve done is great and it’s all because of music,” said Ray Villarreal.

With only five minutes on stage to showcase their talents to a panel of judges, the real work goes on months and maybe even years in advance. Each individual puts in hours of practice and sacrifice, but when doing something you’re passionate about, all that practice doesn’t feel so much like work.

“Entertaining a crowd is my favorite part of performing because I think I’m a good artist, but an even better performer. I think that’s what makes you stand out – engaging with people and getting them to sing along or even jump in the crowd and crowd surf. I think it’s fun,” Villarreal said.

The audience is really able to reflect on the importance of interpersonal cultural diversity, while being exposed to the many cultural performances. From Bollywood to mixes of hip-hop and traditional Bhangra, each performance is judged on things like creativity, technical achievements and skill.

“I was very engaged by the cultural dance and music groups who not only presented strong, well-rehearsed pieces, but also aimed to share cultural dance and music forms with a broad UT audience,” said Rebecca Rossen, judge and professional dancer, choreographer, and assistant professor in UT’s Department of Theatre and Dance.

“I was specifically looking for strong collaboration in group pieces, clarity and excellence in concept and execution, skill, uniqueness, and stage presence,” Rossen said.

That stage presence translated into social media using “#TexasRevue” which managed to reach over 60,000 people through personal tweets, media coverage and Instagram. Posts of friends and fellow students rooting on such a variety of artistic styles goes to show the diversity in the UT community.

Riju Humagain, logistics officer for Texas Revue, said “I think Texas Revue is unique because it honestly showcases such a diverse set of talents that is present in this University.”

All those components came together when Texas Nach Baliye, a traditional Indian dance team received the “Overall Winner” award at the end of the night.  

Poo Poo Platter: Serving Up Austin Drag

Jessica Jones, Fatima Puri, Shannon Smith

At 9:20, the stage manager throws open the dressing room door.

“Ready to go on at 9:30?” he asks.

But everyone shakes their head; Cupcake is running late—they’ll need more time. Seconds later, a frazzled man rushes in with a large suitcase in tow. The dressing room quickly becomes a center of chaos.

He yells that he only needs ten minutes. As Brady rips open the suitcase, one thing is clear: a transformation is about to take place.

Brady puts a hair net over his short, buzzed head and gets to work on his face. Quick brush stokes of foundation, blush, eye shadow. He swiftly applies glue to his fake eye lashes and places them perfectly on his lids. While he finishes up his lipstick, someone straps his heels. He shoves gel implants into his otherwise empty bra, and gives them a shake as he glances in the mirror. Next, he places two different wigs on his head and pins then into place.

Exactly 10 minutes later as promised, he sings, “Cupcake is reaaaady!”

Someone hands him the mic and he steps onto stage.

The dressing room looks like the aftermath of a tornado, but the five remaining queens backstage are too excited to even notice the mess. Tonight is a Poo Poo Platter show—and they’re ready to serve up the most unique of Austin’s drag.

Poo Poo Platter was formed three and a half years ago, after founding member Waldo moved to Austin and saw an opportunity to bring a new type of drag to the area. At the time, Austin drag was focused on female allusion, but Waldo knew others would want to join him in bringing a lighter-hearted, funnier type of drag to the city. With now more than ten members and at least two shows a month you could say it was a success.

Waldo, stage name Bulimianne Rhapsody, the creator of Poo Poo Platter, gets ready before the show. Photo courtesy of Shannon Smith.

Waldo, stage name Bulimianne Rhapsody, the creator of Poo Poo Platter, gets ready before the show.
Photo courtesy of Shannon Smith.

Although they are a troop, every member gets to design their own part of the show, from music and props right down to costumes and makeup.

“We’re very much independent contractors. Everyone does their own thing, they’re responsible for their own acts,” said queen Arcie Cola.

But being a part of the troop certainly has its benefits. It’s easier to book shows when you’re offering more than just one act, and the members understand that. Many of them had solo careers as performers before joining Poo Poo Platter, but enjoy the special relationships that being a part of this group provides.

“You can always be an individual performer, whereas being in a troop it’s a family. So for me it comes down to work and family,” said Zane Zena, who performed as a wrestler previous to joining Poo Poo Platter.

And the closeness of the group is apparent, even to an outsider. Whether they are helping each other in the dressing room, taking a cigarette break or just dancing around together during a rehearsal—it is clear that the group shares a special bond.

A big part of that bond is their agreement that “drag” is something that cannot easily be defined.

“When somebody tells you that you can’t be something—you do it. That’s drag to me,” said Zane Zena.

While Cupcake was more keen on not defining it at all, “I don’t know what is and isn’t drag… It’s not my problem to define the word, I’m not f***** Merriam Webster.”

And while the actual definition of drag may not be important, the troop agreed that there is a definite need to shine a light on drag as a real performing art.

Poo Poo Platter cast. Photo courtesy of Poo Poo Platter.

Poo Poo Platter cast.
Photo courtesy of Poo Poo Platter.

They practice hours a week and spend hundreds, even thousands of dollars, on making their own costumes. Yet, people are still quick to dismiss drag as being a real art. Respect—that is the universal word each queen mentioned. And the Austin International Drag Festival this past weekend was one step in the right direction.

An entire weekend dedicated to promoting and supporting the drag community, Poo Poo Platter was able to host events and mingle with infamous drag queens from around the world. More than anything, the second annual festival acted as a way of spreading the idea that drag is an outlet for artistic expression, not simply men in dresses.

 

cost-of-drag

Community stands by The Hole in the Wall

By: Will Bruner, Karen Martinez, and Nicole Rusli

James Forrest started frequenting the Hole in the Wall as a UT student 20 years ago.

He sat on a red diner barstool with a beer in hand. A giant hole in the red plastic peeked out from underneath him. Randy Echels has been going to the Hole in the Wall since it opened in 1974. It has proven to be a place of cheap beer and live music for 41 years. Hole in the Wall, or the Hole to its regulars, is now in danger of closing when its lease expires at the end of this year. Rising rent rates have threatened the future of yet another Austin music venue.

Austin’s booming real estate market has led to increased land values, and has increased rent for music venues. Encor Realty group, which manages the building of the Hole in the Wall on Guadalupe Street, implied in earlier reports that they had kept rent down as long as possible.

Dive bars such as the Hole have struggled to keep up with rising rents, yet owner Will Tanner is hopeful that an agreement can be reached. Advocacy group Austin Music People are involved in mediating the negotiations between Tanner and Scott Friedman, the representative from Encor. Negotiations have improved gradually, according to AMP Director, Jennifer Houlihan.

“We are still working with the Hole in the Wall and I spoke with the owner Will Tanner yesterday. The lines of communication are open. He is cautiously optimistic that they can come to an agreement and Hole in the Wall can stay where they are for a little bit longer,” said Houlihan.

UT Professor, Wanda Cash, complicated negotiations by starting a well-intentioned petition to designate the Hole as an historic venue. However, because the building was not 50 years old, this only complicated negotiations with the owner.

“We knew that wasn’t going to fly…not because it didn’t deserve it, we just know how that commission works and what Will was saying was that it was causing him difficulties when negotiating with the landlord, because it was putting the landlord into a corner,” said Houlihan.

Although the petition closed, it shows just how much the Hole in the Wall means to the community. Because of its proximity to UT, It has become a popular drinking spot for grad students and professors. Cash, who has been going to the Hole since she was a grad student in the late 70’s, is concerned that the drag is losing its character.

“My concern was that one day we’re going to walk on Guadalupe Street and it’s going to be a chain store – and the identity of the Drag won’t be there anyway and you might as well be anywhere in the United States,” said Cash.

Connection to the Journalism School

Wanda Cash, Associate Director

Tom Johnson, Professor

Rusty Todd, Professor

CMAHole2

 

Hope is not lost for the Hole in the Wall. Houlihan believes that an agreement can be reached.

“The agreement would probably include some sort of investment from the club owners in the physical space; keeping it up, maybe repainting the bathroom…to keep the property value up. So when they do finish their lease it’s in good condition,” said Houlihan.

Tom Johnson, a Professor in the School of Journalism, has tried to reestablish the Hole as the journalism bar by inviting colleagues and students to go.

“It just feels to me like an Austin bar. It connects me to when Austin was starting to develop the idea of “being weird.” It still has that hippie vibe – that old Austin vibe. It’s important to keep those places alive because we’ve lost so many others, like the Armadillo …that are really music icons that just shut down,” said Johnson.

Successful artists like Townes Van Zandt, Spoon, Shakey Graves, and Bob Schneider have all jump-started their careers performing at the Hole. Austin Attorney and UT alum, James Forrest, remembers one of their very first live performances.

“Townes Van Zandt…was an Austin music legend. He was bringing his child to this bar and would sing. People would take care of him. Just being part of something original and something authentic that is Austin…. it is probably what’s most precious to me,” said Forrest.

Forrest has been going to the Hole in the Wall for over 20 years and even displays his own artwork next to the music wall of fame.

“For what Austin is, it is one of the last remaining places where original Austin art are welcomed and celebrated. Come by, have a beer, have a dance, have some memories – keep the tradition going,” said Forrest.

Increased rent on Guadalupe, and other Austin music venues, has put pressure on the local music scene as a whole, but Houlihan still believes that we can find a balance between landlords and local music businesses.

“There’s a sweet spot that I think we can find, where we are keeping Austin’s creative spirit, we’re keeping Austin weird, we’re keeping our city affordable enough for our creatives to stay here, but we’re also leaving room for that prosperity for everyone, and I think it’s absolutely possible,” said Houlihan.

 

 

 

Inaugural Stargayzer Fest Celebrates Austin Queer Community

By Anna Daugherty, Emma Ledford and Alex Vickery

More than 100 LGBTQIA musicians, artists, drag performers and comedians from around the world took the stage for the inaugural Stargayzer Festival on Sept. 12-14 at Pine Street Station.

Zahira Gutierrez of Houston band Wild Moccasins sings during their Saturday set. Photo by Alex Vickery

Zahira Gutierrez of Houston band Wild Moccasins sings during their Saturday set. Photo by Alex Vickery

Despite the rainy weather, Austinites of all ages and orientations turned out to support the diverse range of talent within the queer community.

“We’ve got comedians and drag and performance art and we even have yoga and visual artists,” festival organizer Brett Hornsby said. “I think a lot of other pride events just kind of focus on one area alone, and so we just wanted to be as diverse as we could and show the broad spectrum that is being offered.”

Stargayzer has been years in the making, Hornsby said. Over the last five years, he was inspired by the diverse range of queer artists he met while touring with performer Christeene Vale.

“I think by [touring] I discovered how much incredible queer talent there is all over the world and how it’s kind of being overlooked,” Hornsby said. “I wanted to bring everyone together and make something that’s focused just on that.”

Photo by Alex Vickery

Two festivalgoers skip around puddles after the rain clears at Stargayzer Festival at Pine Street Station. Photo by Alex Vickery

Scheduling Stargayzer for the weekend before Austin Pride Week wasn’t intentional, Hornsby said, but it was good timing. The weather, though, was less than ideal, as rain soaked the festival grounds all day Friday and part of Saturday.

Pegzilla, from Toronto, poses with her "baby." Photo by Alex Vickery

Pegzilla, from Toronto, poses with her “baby.” Photo by Alex Vickery

The festival atmosphere, however, was anything but gloomy. Austin-based comedic drag performer Rebecca Havemeyer embraced the unexpected weather.

“I like how we have rain. We never have rain in Austin,” Havemeyer said. “The grass is growing and the ants are crawling.”

Tamara Hoover and Maggie Lea, co-owners of queer-friendly bar Cheer Up Charlie’s, said that Hornsby came to them with the idea for Stargayzer about six months ago. They jumped at the opportunity to see the Cheer Up community in a different element and location.

“Overall, this community has come out no matter what weather parameters they were given,” Hoover said. “It’s been a really awesome display of how supportive our Austin community is for each other.”

Lea agreed, adding that many festivalgoers didn’t just come for the headliners, but to support the lesser-known local bands and the Austin queer community as a whole.

When Hornsby began booking for the festival, he started with the better-known artists. He ended up getting so many submissions that he had to start turning people down.

“We discovered, on top of everything else, how much crazy stuff was out there, so going through it was really fun,” Hornsby said. “People are like, ‘Oh, you booked all the gay artists in the world!’ But that’s not true at all. There’s so many more.”

Regina The Gentlelady and her band Light Fires traveled all the way from Toronto for the festival. They played pride festivals before, but were attracted to Stargayzer because of the quality and diversity of the talent.

“It’s just a nice showcase of queer talent, and a really broad range of things,” she said. “There’s drag queens and then there’s bands that you wouldn’t even necessarily know are queer, or don’t have a queer agenda or anything, but they just are.”

"Have you ever seen a hairy bagel?" L.A. comedian Brad Loekle entertains a crowd on the main stage between musical performances.

“Have you ever seen a hairy bagel?” L.A. comedian Brad Loekle entertains a crowd on the main stage between musical performances. Photo by Alex Vickery

Though it had its share of challenges, Hornsby hopes the first Stargayzer Festival will create a foundation for the event to happen again next year.

“There’s a lot of groups to juggle and shuffle, but they’ve all been patient and really excited to be a part of something like this,” he said. “We want to make this happen. And whatever happens, happens.”

Final Year of West x West Campus

Dudeman

“Dudeman” photo by Britni Shaw

By Elyana Barrera, Chelsea Bass
Bryce Gibson and Britini Shaw

In the middle of West Campus’s labyrinth of high-rise apartment complexes and just weeks before Austin’s massive South By Southwest Conference, students and young locals gathered for the fifth West By West Campus festival. Showcasing filmmakers and artists, the block party with a do-it-yourself attitude was hosted by cooperative housing groups on Feb. 21-22.

Started in February of 2010, the festival began as a way for underaged bands and concertgoers to celebrate with their own all-ages free shows according to director Tessa Hunt. Now in it’s final year, West By West Campus has grown to include a film festival portion where eight short films submission are chosen and then judged by a panel on day one of the festival.

The heart of the festival, however, remains to be its second day music portion, where 36 bands played at co-ops, starting at noon and ending at 10:30 p.m. Cooperative housing French House, 21st Street Co-op and Pearl Street Co-op were the three venues hosting musical talent including Super Thief, Magna Carda and the Numerators. The vibrant, bohemian interiors of the co-ops, along with do-it-yourself zine-style posters served as an apt backdrop to West By West Campus’s engaged yet cool crowd.

From looking at the abundant amount of people enjoying live music at the festival, it would be impossible to tell that lack of funds almost kept West By West Campus from happening this year. Usually paid for out-of-pocket by founders of the event, the cost of hosting along with permits and port-a-potties, became a problem that needed to be solved. Jennifer Gritti, social media/donations/strategy manager for West By West Campus, saw a solution in starting a “kickstarter.”

“We decided to fund the event through kickstarter so we didn’t have to deal with corporate sponsors,” Gritti said. “Not only did corp. sponsors kills the vibe of the fest last year, they were a bit difficult to work with and didn’t quite share our same vision. As our last hurrah, we wanted to take it to the people, and if they wanted to help, we would give them that option.”

Gritti used Kickstarter, a website that helps raise funds for independently-run projects by many, small donations, to raise the baseline of $3,000 needed to run the West Campus festival.

“Admittedly, we’ve never asked for your help in the past, but this year we’re going to need it,” Gritti posted on the West By West Campus Kickstarter page. The page was able to bring in $3,140 from 168 backers, 109 of which pledged only $5-10. Although the page was set up in the middle of January, the $3,000 goal was not reached until just 15 hours before the cutoff date of Feb. 7. The event also received monetary donations outside of Kickstarter from small local businesses such as Bodega and keg donations from Circle Brewery.

Gritti guessed approximately 1,500 people attended the event throughout the day.

“The turnout this year was great,” Gritti said. “We don’t have any numbers, but the people that wanted to be there were there and thats what really mattered.”

Though the funding for this year’s West By West Campus was reached fairly easily, the founders of the festival do not want it to stray too far from its roots and have still decided that this is its final year. Gritti and Hunt cite preserving the integrity of the festival as the reason founders of the fest have decided to end West By West Campus in its fifth year — they want to see other young adults starting their own festivals and they hope the spirit of West By West Campus can inspire.

Videography by Bryce Gibson. Photos by Britini Shaw and Chelsea Bass. Blog post by Elyana Barrera.

Austin Poetry Slam: The Spoken Word Revolution

By Jasmine Alexander, Jessica Duong, Kaine Korzekwa and Joan Vinson

Sam Sax reads in the Austin Poetry Slam at Spider House Ballroom on Tuesday, Jan. 28.

Sam Sax competes in the Austin Poetry Slam at Spider House Ballroom on Tuesday, Jan. 28. The venue hosts the slam every Tuesday at 8 p.m.

The rhymes made during the Austin Poetry Slam won’t be heard in any high school English class.

It’s not like a typical poetry performance, where artists recite their work to an applauding audience. Instead, an audience with randomly selected judges decides which poets leave with a $100 prize. Hearing the poets cry, scream, laugh, dance, wail or flail during their passionate performances is almost guaranteed.

The result is a poetry competition like no other.

“[Slamming is] kind of like theater or art,” said Victoria Murray, a slam poet. “Once you start going on a regular basis you can’t stop doing it even if you take a hiatus from coming. You’re still always writing, you’re still always thinking about things or performances or lines. Once you love something you can’t just let it stop flowing out of you.”

The Spider House Ballroom hosts the Austin Poetry Slam every Tuesday at 8 p.m. with a $5 admission. Murray fell in love with slamming the first time she attended one in the spring of 2011. Two years later, Murray, who works at a bank, began slamming.

“It’s the modern-day storytelling of our time,” she said. “We’ve lost a lot of that, I think, over the years, especially with social media. People come up here and tell their stories and they tell exactly how they’re feeling, and sometimes a poem can really move you to the point of tears or laughter, or to where you just want to go hug a person, even though you don’t know them.”

The act of “slamming” is relatively new in the world of poetry. Marc Smith is credited with throwing the first poetry slam in Chicago in 1987. According to his website, from then on the poetry slam movement spread across America and the globe — there are poetry slams in Greece, Latvia and Madagascar, to name a few.

Many members of the Austin Poetry Slam see writing poetry and slamming as an outlet for expression. Chris Formey, a poetry slam contestant, uses poetry to help deal with his bipolar disorder and schizophrenic episodes.

“I’ve actually been writing [poetry] since I was in fourth grade,” said Formey, 22. “I’ve always been a writer. It’s been an outlet for me. Sometimes, not having someone to talk to, I can just talk to myself on a page. I try to speak about as many uplifting things as I possibly can. Everyday, I kind of see life as like a boxing match.”

Des Grosshuesch, another slam poet, finds inspiration in everyday activities. She said she got into slams because she likes to read aloud what she writes.

“I spend a lot of time just going and getting on the train, riding it back and forth and talking to people and getting stories from them,” she said. “Mostly people just talk about their lives and they become sort of characters that I talk about.”

Austin Poetry Slam is just one of the weekly spoken word shows in Austin. Neo-Soul, at Mr. Catfish & More, and Kick Butt Poetry, at the Kick Butt Coffee on Airport Boulevard, also attract top slam poets of the area. Check out the map below to see how close you live to a poetry slam.

“In general, it’s a family,” said Murray. “We fight and we get annoyed with each other, but we all still drop everything and give you the shirt off our backs. We all come from so many different backgrounds, [yet] we can all meld together so well.”

Austin in a Day


Austin LogoFBy: Batli Joselevitz, Lily Morris, Sheila Buenrostro

 

9:00 a.m. Austin Visitors Center

Start your trip to Austin at the Visitors Center to get  ideas of how to spend your day.

Address: 209 E 6th St Austin, TX 78701
Phone Number: (512) 478-0098
Price: Free

10:30 a.m. Mount Bonnell & 360 Bridge

For the best view in town head over to Mount Bonnell. After walking up a long set of stairs, you will be standing at one of the highest vantage points, overlooking both Lake Austin and the Hill Country. After leaving there, make sure to take the scenic route to the next destination by taking the 360 Bridge, also known as the Pennybacker Bridge, only four miles away!

Address: 3800 Mt. Bonnell Rd., 78731 & 5300 N Capital of Texas Hwy Austin, TX 78730
Price: Free

11:30 a.m. Farmers Market


For a mid morning snack, make your way over to Highland Mall for the Barton Creek Farmers Market where you can find fresh food, music, and local artisans.

Address: 6001 Airport Blvd Austin, Texas 78752
Price: Free

1:00 p.m. Mexic-Arte Museum


Founded in 1984, the Mexic-Arte Museum is a great way to learn about the traditional and contemporary culture of Mexico and Latin America, which has been very prevalent in the state of Texas and Austin. The current exhibit “Creating La Muerte: Jose Guadalupe Posada 100th Anniversary,” is a must see!

Address: 419 Congress Ave., Austin, Texas 78701
Price: Free admission on Sunday

2:00 p.m. Castle Hill


One of the defining characteristics of Austin is its art scene. Castle Hill is an outdoor blank canvas for local graffiti artists to display their talent. Plus, it makes a great background for an impromptu photo shoot.

Address: 1100 Baylor St, Austin, Texas 78701
Price: Free

4:00 p.m. South Congress


One of Austin’s most well-known streets, South Congress, will provide you with an endless array of shopping, dining, live music, a killer view of Austin’s skyline. It is home to the infamous “i love you so much” wall, the perfect background for a picture with your loved ones. If you still have room for dessert make sure to check out Amy’s Ice Cream, we recommend Mexican Vanilla.

Address: 1600 S Congress Avenue, Austin Texas 78701
Price: Varies

6:30 p.m. South Congress Bridge


As the day comes to an end, head north towards the South Congress Bridge to watch thousands of bats emerge from beneath the bridge and into the sunset.

Address: 100 South Congress Ave., Austin, Texas 78701
Price: Free

8:30 p.m. Downtown Austin

And finally, save the best for last! Hit up the town whether it be Stubbs for barbecue and live music, Dirty 6th, Rainey Street, or even a local coffee shop…everyone is guaranteed a good time in Austin, Texas.

Address: All Over

Price: Varies

Rattletree School of Marimba

By: Sheila Buenrostro, Jeffrey Kahn, Katey Psencik

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What is a marimba?

A marimba is a deep-toned wooden instrument that resembles a xylophone. Rakefet Avramovitz, program director at the Rattletree School of marimba, says “it’s a big, wooden xylophone. It’s just high-vibration, high-energy dance music.”

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What makes it different than a xylophone?
The key. A xylophone’s range includes a full octave above a marimba — which means xylophones extend to the very top note of a piano. Marimbas are lower pitched.

Where is it from?
Scholars argue several origins of the marimba instrument, including Latin America, Africa and Asia. The most commonly believed origins of the marimba are in Africa and Guatemala. The type of marimba music played by the Rattletree School of Marimba is inspired by the Shona tribe of Zimbabwe, Africa.

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Joel Laviolette, Artistic Director

Rakefet Avramovitz, Program Director

Jane Rundquist, student

Kate Van der Voort, student

Shanna Whittaker, student

For more information on the Rattletree School of Marimba, visit their website.

Healthy sounds at HAAM Benefit Day 2013

Health Alliance for Austin Musicians raises awareness and money on its annual benefit day. 

By Rebecca Wright, Alsha Khan, Rachel Marino and Kelly Eisenbarger

Jorge Harada of Ruby Dee and the Snakehandlers performing at Antone's Record Shop. Photo by Rebecca Wright

Jorge Harada of Ruby Dee and the Snakehandlers performs at Antone’s Record Shop. Photo by Rebecca Wright

On Tuesday Sept. 24, Health Alliance for Austin Musicians extended its reach on the annual HAAM Benefit Day by generating a student audience at the Texas Hillel Jewish community center. Students were drawn in by the sounds of acoustic beat boxing from SaulPaul and the irresistible chance of winning Whataburger giveaways, a combination no college student could resist.

This year, musicians assembled all across town and a plethora of local businesses donated five percent of their daily proceeds to help raise awareness for Austin’s musicians. HAAM’s mission is to provide low cost or free health care to Austin’s low income, uninsured, working musicians.

Since HAAM Benefit Day started in 2006, the fundraiser has continued to grow in size of performances, sponsors and money raised. Last year, the day raised $312,000, and the goal this year was $350,000. HAAM will have this year’s fundraising total number on Oct. 14.

“This year we had 289 participating businesses and well over 200 musical performances,” said Chris Alberts, Director of Development for HAAM. “It was a great day with both musicians and businesses sharing their support and enthusiasm with us to make it possible.”

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Whole Foods Market was once again the presenting sponsor, hosting musical acts from 6 a.m. to well past midnight.

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